Iraq Vet Kills Himself After Being Ordered to Commit “War Crimes”

Iraq Vet Kills Himself After Being Ordered to Commit “War Crimes”

“These things go far beyond what most are even aware of”

Paul Joseph Watson
Infowars.com
June 24, 2013

Daniel Somers. Image: Facebook

Iraq war veteran Daniel Somers committed suicide following an arduous battle with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) that was caused by his role in committing “crimes against humanity,” according to the soldier’s suicide note.

Somers was assigned to a Tactical Human-Intelligence Team (THT) in Baghdad which saw him involved in more than 400 combat missions as a machine gunner in the turret of a Humvee, in addition to his role in conducting interrogations.

Somers’ suicide note is a powerful indictment of the invasion of Iraq and how it ruined the lives of both countless millions of Iraqis as well as innumerable US troops sent in to do the dirty work of the military-industrial complex.

“The simple truth is this: During my first deployment, I was made to participate in things, the enormity of which is hard to describe. War crimes, crimes against humanity,” wrote Somers. “Though I did not participate willingly, and made what I thought was my best effort to stop these events, there are some things that a person simply can not come back from. I take some pride in that, actually, as to move on in life after being part of such a thing would be the mark of a sociopath in my mind. These things go far beyond what most are even aware of.”

Somers also complains about how he was forced to “participate in the ensuing coverup” of such crimes.

Somers’ death serves to refocus attention on the fact that military veterans are committing suicide in droves after being afflicted with PTSD as a direct result of committing atrocities while in combat.

As Somers highlights in his note, 22 military veterans commit suicide every single day. Amongst active-duty soldiers, more than one a day commit suicide, a figure that surpassed the number of US troops killed in combat in Afghanistan.

“And according to some experts, the military may be undercounting the problem because of the way it calculates its suicide rate,” reports the New York Times, adding that experts cannot understand “the root causes of why military suicide is rising so fast.”

However, the root causes are laid bare in Somers’ suicide note. US troops are being ordered to commit atrocities so vile that the only way many of them can cope with the horror of what they have done is by killing themselves.

Examples of atrocities aided directly or indirectly by US troops in Iraq include;

– Orders to slaughter “all military age men” during some operations;

– Torturing detainees – many of whom had never engaged in combat and were totally innocent – at grisly prison camps across the country;

Raping and torturing children at the infamous Abu Ghraib detention facility while they shrieked in terror. Women forced to watch later begged to be killed.

Sodomizing detainees with chemical lights and broom sticks;

– Indiscriminately firing upon and killing journalists and children from the air;

Massacring entire groups of unarmed Iraqis, including children and the elderly in Hadith.

“This is what brought me to my actual final mission. Not suicide, but a mercy killing,” wrote Somers, adding that him living “any kind of ordinary life is an insult to those who died at my hand.”

Read Somers’ full suicide note below, obtained by Gawker and published with his family’s permission.

———————————————————–

I am sorry that it has come to this.

The fact is, for as long as I can remember my motivation for getting up every day has been so that you would not have to bury me. As things have continued to get worse, it has become clear that this alone is not a sufficient reason to carry on. The fact is, I am not getting better, I am not going to get better, and I will most certainly deteriorate further as time goes on. From a logical standpoint, it is better to simply end things quickly and let any repercussions from that play out in the short term than to drag things out into the long term.

You will perhaps be sad for a time, but over time you will forget and begin to carry on. Far better that than to inflict my growing misery upon you for years and decades to come, dragging you down with me. It is because I love you that I can not do this to you. You will come to see that it is a far better thing as one day after another passes during which you do not have to worry about me or even give me a second thought. You will find that your world is better without me in it.

I really have been trying to hang on, for more than a decade now. Each day has been a testament to the extent to which I cared, suffering unspeakable horror as quietly as possible so that you could feel as though I was still here for you. In truth, I was nothing more than a prop, filling space so that my absence would not be noted. In truth, I have already been absent for a long, long time.

My body has become nothing but a cage, a source of pain and constant problems. The illness I have has caused me pain that not even the strongest medicines could dull, and there is no cure. All day, every day a screaming agony in every nerve ending in my body. It is nothing short of torture. My mind is a wasteland, filled with visions of incredible horror, unceasing depression, and crippling anxiety, even with all of the medications the doctors dare give. Simple things that everyone else takes for granted are nearly impossible for me. I can not laugh or cry. I can barely leave the house. I derive no pleasure from any activity. Everything simply comes down to passing time until I can sleep again. Now, to sleep forever seems to be the most merciful thing.

You must not blame yourself. The simple truth is this: During my first deployment, I was made to participate in things, the enormity of which is hard to describe. War crimes, crimes against humanity. Though I did not participate willingly, and made what I thought was my best effort to stop these events, there are some things that a person simply can not come back from. I take some pride in that, actually, as to move on in life after being part of such a thing would be the mark of a sociopath in my mind. These things go far beyond what most are even aware of.

To force me to do these things and then participate in the ensuing coverup is more than any government has the right to demand. Then, the same government has turned around and abandoned me. They offer no help, and actively block the pursuit of gaining outside help via their corrupt agents at the DEA. Any blame rests with them.

Beyond that, there are the host of physical illnesses that have struck me down again and again, for which they also offer no help. There might be some progress by now if they had not spent nearly twenty years denying the illness that I and so many others were exposed to. Further complicating matters is the repeated and severe brain injuries to which I was subjected, which they also seem to be expending no effort into understanding. What is known is that each of these should have been cause enough for immediate medical attention, which was not rendered.

Lastly, the DEA enters the picture again as they have now managed to create such a culture of fear in the medical community that doctors are too scared to even take the necessary steps to control the symptoms. All under the guise of a completely manufactured “overprescribing epidemic,” which stands in stark relief to all of the legitimate research, which shows the opposite to be true. Perhaps, with the right medication at the right doses, I could have bought a couple of decent years, but even that is too much to ask from a regime built upon the idea that suffering is noble and relief is just for the weak.

However, when the challenges facing a person are already so great that all but the weakest would give up, these extra factors are enough to push a person over the edge.

Is it any wonder then that the latest figures show 22 veterans killing themselves each day? That is more veterans than children killed at Sandy Hook, every single day. Where are the huge policy initiatives? Why isn’t the president standing with those families at the state of the union? Perhaps because we were not killed by a single lunatic, but rather by his own system of dehumanization, neglect, and indifference.

It leaves us to where all we have to look forward to is constant pain, misery, poverty, and dishonor. I assure you that, when the numbers do finally drop, it will merely be because those who were pushed the farthest are all already dead.

And for what? Bush’s religious lunacy? Cheney’s ever growing fortune and that of his corporate friends? Is this what we destroy lives for?

Since then, I have tried everything to fill the void. I tried to move into a position of greater power and influence to try and right some of the wrongs. I deployed again, where I put a huge emphasis on saving lives. The fact of the matter, though, is that any new lives saved do not replace those who were murdered. It is an exercise in futility.

Then, I pursued replacing destruction with creation. For a time this provided a distraction, but it could not last. The fact is that any kind of ordinary life is an insult to those who died at my hand. How can I possibly go around like everyone else while the widows and orphans I created continue to struggle? If they could see me sitting here in suburbia, in my comfortable home working on some music project they would be outraged, and rightfully so.

I thought perhaps I could make some headway with this film project, maybe even directly appealing to those I had wronged and exposing a greater truth, but that is also now being taken away from me. I fear that, just as with everything else that requires the involvement of people who can not understand by virtue of never having been there, it is going to fall apart as careers get in the way.

The last thought that has occurred to me is one of some kind of final mission. It is true that I have found that I am capable of finding some kind of reprieve by doing things that are worthwhile on the scale of life and death. While it is a nice thought to consider doing some good with my skills, experience, and killer instinct, the truth is that it isn’t realistic. First, there are the logistics of financing and equipping my own operation, then there is the near certainty of a grisly death, international incidents, and being branded a terrorist in the media that would follow. What is really stopping me, though, is that I simply am too sick to be effective in the field anymore. That, too, has been taken from me.

Thus, I am left with basically nothing. Too trapped in a war to be at peace, too damaged to be at war. Abandoned by those who would take the easy route, and a liability to those who stick it out—and thus deserve better. So you see, not only am I better off dead, but the world is better without me in it.

This is what brought me to my actual final mission. Not suicide, but a mercy killing. I know how to kill, and I know how to do it so that there is no pain whatsoever. It was quick, and I did not suffer. And above all, now I am free. I feel no more pain. I have no more nightmares or flashbacks or hallucinations. I am no longer constantly depressed or afraid or worried

I am free.

I ask that you be happy for me for that. It is perhaps the best break I could have hoped for. Please accept this and be glad for me.

*********************

Ron Paul on The Death of Daniel Somers

Ron Paul
Infowars.com
June 25, 2013

I am reading the heartbreaking suicide note of Daniel Somers, a US combat veteran who spent several years fighting in Iraq. Mr. Somers was only 30 years old when he took his own life, after being tormented by the horrific memories of what he experienced in Iraq.  He wrote:

“The simple truth is this: During my first deployment, I was made to participate in things, the enormity of which is hard to describe. War crimes, crimes against humanity. Though I did not participate willingly, and made what I thought was my best effort to stop these events, there are some things that a person simply can not come back from.”

Many who shout the loudest that we must “support the troops” urge sending them off to unwinnable and undeclared wars in which there is no legitimate US interest. The US military has been abused by those who see military force as a first resort rather than the last resort and only in self-defense. This abuse has resulted in a generation of American veterans facing a life sentence in the prison of tortured and deeply damaged minds as well as broken bodies.

The numbers sadly tell the story: more military suicides than combat deaths in 2012, some 22 military veterans take their lives every day, nearly 30 percent of veterans treated by the VA have PTSD.

We should be saddened but not shocked when we see the broken men and women return from battles overseas. We should be angry with those who send them to suffer and die in unnecessary wars. We should be angry with those who send them to kill so many people overseas for no purpose whatsoever. We should be afraid of the consequences of such a foolish and dangerous foreign policy. We should demand an end to the abuse of military members and a return to a foreign policy that promotes peace and prosperity instead of war and poverty.

**************************

Why The Alarming Rise In Suicide Rates Among Vets?

Donna Anderson
Infowars.com
June 25, 2013

Iraq war veteran Daniel Somers.

No one likes to talk about death or suicide, especially when it involves the brave men and women defending our country. But, in 2012, Pentagon officials announced that battle casualties are no longer the primary reason for soldiers’ deaths. Now, the primary cause of death is suicide.

The alarming rise in suicide rates among veterans simply can’t be ignored. In 2011 there were 283 suicides among military personnel. In 2012 that number jumped 15 percent to 303. And according to an article atForbes, so far in 2013, every 65 minutes a military veteran commits suicide. That’s 22 suicides per day.

A suicide note left by Iraq war veteran Daniel Somers and released to the public by his family offers some insights:

“The simple truth is this: During my first deployment, I was made to participate in things, the enormity of which is hard to describe. War crimes, crimes against humanity,” wrote Somers. “Though I did not participate willingly, and made what I thought was my best effort to stop these events, there are some things that a person simply can not come back from. I take some pride in that, actually, as to move on in life after being part of such a thing would be the mark of a sociopath in my mind. These things go far beyond what most are even aware of.”

On Friday, David Knight interviewed Dr. William Francis Pepper during the Alex Jones show. Pepper is an English Barrister and an American attorney who’s currently working with Sirhan Sirhan, trying to reopen his case. Pepper believes there is overwhelming evidence that indicates Sirhan was mentally programmed by the CIA to assassinate Senator Robert F. Kennedy.

What does Sirhan Sirhan have to do with the rising suicide rate among veterans?

In the early 1950s the CIA’s Scientific Intelligence Division launched Project MKUltra, an experiment in behavioral engineering of humans, a.k.a. mind control or brainwashing. The project was officially abandoned in 1973 but there’s evidence that it still continues today under different names and agencies.

One of the most successful techniques used to gain control of the subject’s mind was to induce a psychotic break or split personality in the subject. To accomplish this, subjects were exposed to unspeakable atrocities – they were forced to witness and perform rapes and other sexual abuses, they were tortured and forced to torture others, they were drugged, and humiliated, and forced to experience or participate in highly-traumatic and shocking events, over and over again until their mind just shattered into pieces.

Once the subject suffered a psychotic break, it was easy to go in and reprogram each different “personality” to kill or place a bomb or follow whatever orders it was given.

Is the United States government practicing mind control techniques on our unwary service people?

The very fact that our combat vets are and were repeatedly exposed to atrocities like the slaughter of all military age men, the rape and torture of children, the torture of detainees, and massacre after massacre of entire groups of people makes them susceptible to psychotic breaks, just like the subjects of the MLK Mind Control Project. And it’s those psychotic breaks that make them more susceptible to suggestions – wherever or whoever they come from.

*************************

Which veterans are at highest risk for suicide?

PTSD, injuries combine with everyday stresses; studies also say women especially vulnerable.

Uncounted Casualties: Part II

Jay Janner

Isabelle Bigham, 4, holds a photo of her father, Wendell Bigham, 28, who committed suicide outside their home in Killeen last October. Bigham suffered from PTSD and a back injury he received during his time in Iraq with the Missouri National Guard. His physical pain made it difficult for him to work, Isabelle’s mother said.

Special Report: Uncounted Casualties

Loved ones cope with veterans' suicides gallery

Loved ones cope with veterans’ suicides

By American-Statesman Investigative Team

The stresses that can contribute to suicide — relationship problems, legal problems, mental illness, depression — are the same for military personnel and veterans as for the rest of the population, experts say.

But the former have higher rates of post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury, both of which increase the chance of self-harm, said Peter Gutierrez, co-director of the Military Suicide Research Consortium in Denver, a joint effort by the U.S. military and research scientists to understand and prevent suicidal behavior. Having two or more such conditions that affect mental health — known as co-morbidity — is also known to increase the risk.

photo

According to Department of Veterans Affairs data, the likelihood of suicide among Afghanistan and Iraq veterans was greatest during the first two years after leaving active duty; it declined by half after four to six years had passed. Although those veterans faced a “significantly higher” risk than the general population, it’s unclear how they stack up against veterans of other wars, such as Vietnam.

“One of the questions that clearly needs to be answered is how does the suicide rate among our youngest veterans compare to suicide rates among other (groups of veterans)?” Gutierrez said.

Research is trickling in that addresses that question. A study released in June by the VA found that suicide risk in Iraq and Afghanistan veterans diagnosed with a mental health condition was four times higher than in veterans without that diagnosis.

Studies have shown that male veterans are more than twice as likely to commit suicide as men who aren’t veterans. Military service appears to have put women at even more risk for suicide than their male counterparts.

Not only have the wars subjected unprecedented numbers of female service members to combat experiences that rival those of men, they are also vulnerable to sexual assault by their male comrades. The long-term effects of these types of traumas is unknown, but a 2008 study of 6,000 female suicide victims showed that those who served in the military during the current conflicts were three times as likely to commit suicide than those who had never been in the military.

K.C. Dobson was 24 and had been married only 19 months when she shot herself in the heart in Copperas Cove last November.

Her Army photos show a beaming, freckle-faced young woman in fatigues, her dark hair pulled back in a bun. But her smile masked what family members said was emotional and physical pain that dogged her throughout her deployment to Iraq and after her 2010 discharge.

“She was under a lot of stress, emotional stress,” said her husband, Kenneth Dobson, 23, who is stationed at Fort Hood and preparing for his second deployment to Afghanistan. “At the time, I didn’t know how much.”

He said his wife had been injured in the Army and had what is called a permanent profile, an official note that a soldier has physical limitations. “Some days, she couldn’t move much,” he said, adding that when she tried to sit out certain exercises with her unit, she was put on extra duty.

The couple had made plans to separate but were still living together last fall, and Kenneth Dobson said he saw no signs that his wife was contemplating suicide. “She was going to school and working at Papa John’s. She seemed happy,” he said.

Her mother, Liz Carver of Aurora, Ill., said her daughter had been on “all kinds of medication” and sought psychiatric help before her deployment. “She didn’t tell me everything,” she said. “She didn’t want to worry me. She was pretty independent.”

The day she went into a room and shot herself, K.C. sent a text message to her friends and family. It said, “I love you. Bye.”

***************************

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